The Big Read - About the book

Published in 1960, the Pulitzer Prize winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on author Harper Lee's observations of her family and neighbors, as well as on an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936, when she was a child. The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with the serious issues of rape and racial inequality. The narrator's father, Atticus Finch, has served as a moral hero for many readers and as a model of integrity for lawyers. 

As a Southern Gothic novel and a Bildungsroman, the primary themes of To Kill a Mockingbird involve racial injustice and the destruction of innocence. Scholars have noted that Lee also addresses issues of class, courage, compassion, and gender roles in the American Deep South. The book is widely taught in schools in English-speaking countries with lessons that emphasize tolerance and decry prejudice. Despite its themes, To Kill a Mockingbird has been subject to campaigns for removal from public classrooms, often challenged for its use of racial epithets.

To Kill a Mockingbird was adapted into an Oscar-winning film in 1962 by director Robert Mulligan, with a screenplay by Horton Foote. Since 1990, a play based on the novel has been performed annually in Harper Lee's hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. 

 

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_kill_a_mockingbird